Volume 38

38.1—SPRING 2006

Articles:

“’Household Forms and Ceremonies’: Narrating Routines in Elizabeth Gaskell’s Cranford—Natalie Kapetanios Meir, p. 1
“The Riches of Redundancy: Our Mutual Friend”—John R. Reed, p. 15
“The Empire of the Future: Imperialism and Modernism in H. G. Wells”—Paul Cantor and Peter Hufnagel, p. 36
“Cather’s ‘Midi Romanesque’: Missionsaries, Myth, and the Grail inDeath Comes for the Archbishop”—Klaus P. Stich, p. 57
“’Lita is—jazz’: the Harlem Renaissance, Cabaret Culture, and Racial Amalgamation in Edith Wharton’s Twilight Sleep”—Jean C. Griffith, p. 74
The Quiet American and the Novel”—Douglas Kerr, p. 95

Essay-Review:

“Jane Austen Criticism, 1951-2004:”—Karl Kroeber, p. 108

Reviews:

Black, Michael. Lawrence’s England: The Major Fiction, 1913-20—Viriginia Hyde, p. 119
Stape, J. H., ed. Joseph Conrad, Notes on Life and Letters—Wallace Watson, p. 121
Cushman, Keith and Earl G. Ingersoll, eds. D. H. Lawrence: New Worlds—Andrew Harrison, p. 123
Davis, Thadious. Games of Property: Law, Race, Gender, and Faulkner’s “Go Down, Moses”—Kathy Pfeiffer, p. 125
Fort, Jeff, trans., Albert Dichy, Werner Hamacher, David E. Wellbery, eds. Jean Genet, The Declared Enemy: Texts and Interviews—Mark Spitzer, p. 126
Karem, Jeff. The Romance of Authenticity: The Cultural Politics of Regional and Ethnic Literatures—Nicholas Sloboda, p. 128
Peretz, Eyal. Literature, Disaster, and the Enigma of Power: A Reading of “Moby-Dick”—Joy Leighton, p. 129


38.2—SUMMER 2006

Articles:

“Ann Radcliffe and Natural Theology”—Anne Chandler, p. 133
“Trollope’s Professional Gentleman: Medical Training and Medical Practice in Doctor Thorne and The Warden”—Timothy Ziegenhagen, p. 154
“Not Trying to Talk Alike and Succeeding: The Authoritative Word and Internally Persuasive Word in Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn”—Paul Lynch, p. 172
“Lamarckism and the Construction of Transcendence in The House of Mirth”—Sharon Kim, p. 187
“Freud, Frazer, an Lawrence’s Palimpsestic Novella: Dreams and the Heaviness of Male Destiny in The Fox”—Peter Balbert, p. 211
“Blake’s Dialetics of Vision and Stead’s Critique of Pollitry in The Man Who Loved Children”—Michael Ackland, p. 234

Essay-Review:

“D. H. Lawrence Today: Old Issues and New Editions”—Andrew Harrison, p. 250

Reviews:

Bruccoli, Matthew J. and Judith S. Baughman, eds. The Sons of Maxwell Perkins: Letters of F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Thomas Wolfe, and Their Editors—Thomas K. Meier, p. 262
Cousineau, Thomas. Ritual Unbound: Reading Sacrifce in Modernist Fiction—Andrew Mozina, p. 263
Goodlad, Lauren M. E. Victorian Literature and the Victorian State: Character and Governance in a Liberal Society—Nicholas Birns, p. 265
Labatt, Blair. Faulkner the Storyteller—Taylor Hagood, p. 267
Wolfe, Cary. Animal Rites: American Culture, the Discourse of Species, and Posthumanist Theory—Susan McHugh, p. 269
Wolfreys, Julian. Victorian Hauntings: Spectrality, Gothic, and the Uncanny and Literature—Michelle Ruggaber Doughtery, p. 271


38.3—FALL 2006

Articles:

“Staging a Lesson: The Theatricals and Proper Conduct in Mansfield Park”—Anna Lott, p. 275
The Good Soldier and Capital’s Interiority Complex”—Carey J. Mickalites, p. 288
“From Text to Tableau: Ekphrastic Enchantment in Mrs. Dalloway and To the Lighthouse”—Kathryn Stelmach, p. 304
“Mourning the Death of the Raj? Melancholia as Historical Engagement in Paul Scott’s Raj Quartet”—Jason Howard Mazey, p. 327
“Uncanny Spaces: Trauma, Cultural Memory, and the Female Body in Gayl Jones’s Corregidora and Maxine Hong Kingston’s The Woman Warrior”—Jennier Griffiths, p. 353

Reviews:

Cleere, Eileen. Avuncularism: Capitalism, Patriarchy and Nineteenth-Century English Culture—Tara McGann, p. 372
Curnutt, Kirk, ed. A Historical Guide to F. Scott Fitzgerald and Wagner-Martin, Linda. Zelda Scott Fitzgerald: An American Woman’s Life—Michael Nowlin, p. 374
Phelan, James. Living to Tell About It: A Rhetoric and Ethics of Charater Narration—Janis Caldwell, p. 377
Titus, Mary. The Ambivalent Art of Katherine Anne Porter and Unrue, Darlene Harbour. Katherine Anne Porter: The Life of an Artist—Janis Stout, p. 379
Wood, Ralph C. Flannery O’Connor and the Christ-Haunted South—Helen R. Andretta, p. 382


38.4—WINTER 2006

Special Number: Joyce Carol Oates

Articles:

“Introduction: Humility, Audacity and the Novels of Joyce Carol Oates”—Gavin Cologne-Brookes, p. 385
“Joyce Carol Oates: Writer, Colleague, Friend”—Edmund V. Whiate, p. 395
“Space, Property, and the Psyche: Violent Topographies in Early Oates Novels”—Susana Araújo, p. 397
“Why Can’t Jesse Read? Ethical Identity in Wonderland”—Marilyn C. Wesley, p. 414
“Psychic Visions and Quantum Physics: Oates’s Big Bang and the Limits of Language”—Samuel Chase Coale, p. 427
“What Does it Mean to be a Woman? The Daughter’s Story in Oates’s Novels”—Joanne V. Creighton and Kori A. Binette, p. 440
“The Art of Democracy: Photography in the Novels of Joyce Carol Oates/Rosamond Smith”—Brenda Daly, p. 457
“Feminism, Masculinity, and Nation in Joyce Carol Oates’s Fiction”—Ellen G. Friedman, p. 478
“Why Such Discontent?: Race, Ethnicity, and Masculinity in What I Lived For”—Julie Sheridan, p. 494
“The Fairest in The Land: Blonde and Black Water, the Nonfiction Novels of Joyce Carol Oates”—Sharon Oard Warner, p. 513
“History and Representation in The Falls”—Sharon L. Dean, p. 525
“Murder She Wrote: Review of Because It Is Bitter, and Because It Is My Heart (Reprinted by permission of The Nation)—Henry Louis Gates, Jr., p. 543
“Written Interview and a Conversation with Joyce Carol Oates”—Gavin Cologne-Brookes, p. 547

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